Eliza Fernand

wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-16-21-22.jpg

ELIZA FERNAND

Artist-in-Residence

 
 

My Time In Wassaic

 
 

Please write a paragraph (or a few!) about your time here in Wassaic. You should say a bit about yourself, where you came from, how you got here, what media you like to work in typically, and what you chose to work on while you were here in Wassaic. Then talk about what Wassaic means to you, how it influenced your work, and what you might want others to know about Wassaic. Write from the heart and write in natural language. We want people to get to know you through this work. Be sure to embed hyperlinked words within these body paragraphs, so that we can link out to your portfolio site, exhibitions, movements, etc. Have fun with this!

 
 
 
 

 
 
 

Interview

By Drew Broderick, June 2018
 

Where do you call home?

Grand Rapids, MI.


What is one good thing that has happened in the past 24 hours?

The sun came up, I worked in my studio, I met new people. Oh, that's three things.


Why do you make art? Have your reasons changed over time?

I've always felt the need to make art. Making things with my hands was a part of growing up and is a therapeutic outlet for me. When I went to art school my perception of what art could be broadened, but my idea of who I could be as an artist narrowed to reflect our commercial-gallery-art-star model. I had to do a lot of unlearning after school and meet other radically charged artists who lived and worked outside of the art world system. My work has shifted more in the last two years from what I would term gently political and outwardly feminist, to outwardly political and responsive, while still inviting public participation.


What is a song that you never tire of listening to?

"Orinoco Flow" by Enya.


What have you been reading lately? Thoughts?

I take on book in bite-sized pieces and never finish any of them. Rebecca Solnit books are on my dresser.


What drew you into the contemporary art world?

I had the chance to go to an arts high school, and there was no going back.


What are your studio essentials? What is something unexpected a visitor might encounter?

Bins of discarded fabrics are the basis of my studio.

 
 

When I went to art school my perception of what art could be broadened, but my idea of who I could be as an artist narrowed to reflect our commercial-gallery-art-star model. I had to do a lot of unlearning after school and meet other radically charged artists who lived and worked outside of the art world system.
— Eliza Fernand
 
 
wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-15-35-36.jpg
wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-15-33-04.jpg
wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-15-34-01.jpg
wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-15-32-39.jpg
wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-15-35-59.jpg
wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-15-35-09.jpg
wassaic-project-artist-eliza-fernand-2018-05-21-16-21-22.jpg

Photos by Walker Esner